Past Event! Note: this event has already taken place.

When: Tuesday, October 20th, 2020
Time: 12:00 pm — 1:00 pm
Location:

Online via Zoom

Audience:Anyone
Contact:FacultyofEngineeringandDesign@carleton.ca

Cough is an early recognizable symptom of COVID-19, which presents a set of challenges for diagnosis because coughs are common symptoms of other medical conditions. The creation of unobtrusive remote monitoring tools for medical professionals that may aid in COVID-19 diagnosis, monitoring and contact tracing could lead to more efficient and accurate treatments, especially in this time of physical distancing.

In this talk, graduate student Madison Cohen-McFarlane will discuss the development of what may be one of the first internationally available-upon-request database of COVID-19 cough events, created by a team of researchers at Carleton University. She will review numerous individual cough events obtained through public media interviews with COVID-19 patients and explain how they can be analyzed through audio-based sensing methods that address the frequency, severity and characteristics of the COVID-19 cough. Their work has also been able to differentiate between different cough types (wet vs. dry), which can help in the diagnosis. She will close by offering insights into how this research can be used for rapid exploration and algorithm development, which can then be applied to more extensive datasets and potentially real time applications.


Speaker Bio

Madison Cohen-McFarlane is pursuing her PhD degree in biomedical engineering at Carleton University in the Department of Systems and Computer Engineering. She received her BEng degree in biomedical engineering from the University of Guelph in 2015 and the MASc degree in biomedical engineering from Carleton University in 2017.

Her research is in developing a system to monitor and track non-speech human sounds (e.g. cough, sneeze, snore, etc.). The system would be applicable to smart-home monitoring of respiratory health conditions, including COVID-19, that are prevalent in the older adult population. The end goal would be to improve quality of life by supporting independent living of older adults at home.


About the Series

Ingenious Talks is a special speaker series from the Faculty of Engineering and Design that engages the community in discussions of timely and innovative ideas in engineering, design and technology. Each month a different speaker is spotlighted and they discuss their cutting-edge research. Audience Q&A follows.


 

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